Invisible Educators or Connecting Professionals?

Today we have a new blog post from one of our lovely authors, Jim Crawley of Bath Spa University! Here he discusses teacher education in PCE.

Here are a few interesting things about Post Compulsory Education (PCE) you may not know.

There are 773,000 16– 18- year- olds who study in colleges, compared with 442,000 in schools. A further 71,000 16- to 18- year- olds undertake apprenticeships through colleges and two million adults study or train in English colleges (AoC, 2015 ).

Even with the impact of austerity measures and budget cuts, over 30,000 PCE teachers still gained teaching qualifications in 2012/ 13 (ETF, 2015 ).

In the three decades up to the 2015 election there had been 61 Secretaries of State responsible for skills policy in Britain. Between them they produced 13 major Acts of Parliament and skills policy had flipped between government departments or been shared between departments on ten different occasions (City and Guilds, 2014, p 1).

All of these feature in a new book, the first of its kind, about Teacher Education in PCE.

The third of these ‘interesting things’ really emphasises the volatility and change (an almost incredible amount in the case of this example) which the PCE sector experiences. You would be forgiven for wondering how the first two were ever achieved. The ‘Cinderella sector’ is rightly proud of its achievements, but in a sector which is often almost invisible to governments and many of the public at large, finds it difficult to get its voice heard. Within this professional invisibility, one group of professionals is even more invisible than many of the others, and that is Post Compulsory Teacher Educators (TEds), despite the volume of teachers trained in the sector.

The UK Post Compulsory Education (PCE) sector and its community of TEds has experienced particularly difficult times over the recent period of austerity, even though the mainly workplace-based partnership model of PCE teacher education resonates well with key thinking and current developments in the broader field of teacher education.

The new book, ‘Post Compulsory Teacher Educators – Connecting professionals’ is about PCE teacher education and written by PCE TEds, and it aims to demonstrate that this particular group have much to be proud of, and that their work is one of the key connecting aspects of the development and improvement of teachers in this much under-rated sector.

The book’s authors, Jim Crawley (the editor), Carol Azumah Dennis, Vicky Duckworth, Rebecca Eliahoo, Lynn Machin, Kevin Orr, Denise Robinson and Nena Skrbic are all well-known and well-respected practitioners in PCE. They have produced eight lively, accessible and engaging chapters using their research, ideas and stories from their own work at the front line of training teachers for PCE.  The result is a book which is book is authoritative, critical, rooted in experience and thought provoking, making use of current research and newly-developing thinking. The book will appeal to and be enjoyed by academics and teaching professionals at all levels.

The chapters include an introduction to this group of ‘invisible educators’; how the work they do can be described as having an ‘even more’ quality; what the PCE sector is now, how it has arrived there and where it may go next; the history and development of PCE teacher education; enacting teacher education values; showing how PCE Teacher educators are ‘connecting professionals’; learning lessons from teacher education globally and looking at growing connections as the future for PCE teacher education.

This timely book calls together all those with an interest in PCE teacher education and encourages them to work together for a brighter future.

 

Dr Jim Crawley – Bath Spa University – November 2016

References: 

Association of Colleges, College Key Facts 2015/16. Available at: https://www.aoc.co.uk/sites/default/files/AoC%20College%20Key%20Facts%202015-16%20WEB.pdf 

Zaidi, A., Howat, C. et al., Initial Teacher Education (Provision in FE and Skills). Available at: https://www.aoc.co.uk/sites/default/files/AoC%20College%20Key%20Facts%202015-16%20WEB.pdf

City & Guilds – Sense & Instability: Three decades of skills and employment policy. Available at: http://www.cityandguilds.com/~/media/Documents/news-insight/oct-14/CGSkillsReport2014%20pdf.ashx

If this blog post interests you, why not look a little further? Details of Post Compulsory Teacher Educators: Connecting Professionals can be found at www.criticalpublishing.com.

If you have any questions, you can reach me at keisha@criticalpublishing.com – as always, we would love to hear from you!

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